Forest


This category contains those projects looking to restore, protect or enhance forest habitats around the world.  For wildlife and for people.
 
Please read though the details of the projects looking for your vote, and then select the one you would like to receive funding from EOCA this year. A difficult choice as they are all very worthwhile projects!

Voting in this category runs from 8 October (00.01 BST) to 22 October (12.00 BST) 2018.

 

Looking For Your Support

Red Squirrel in Heather

Nominated by:

A Safe Haven for Red Squirrels:  Securing their Future in Scotland

Website: http://www.treesforlife.org.uk

Red squirrels are at risk of extinction in the UK – but Trees for Life’s pioneering Reds Return project offers hope for their long-term survival in their last real stronghold of Scotland. Numbers of these much-loved mammals have been decimated by reduction of their forest homes to isolated fragments, and by competition and lethal disease from non-native grey squirrels. Reintroducing reds to four carefully chosen Highland woodlands – to which they can’t return without help, as they avoid crossing large open spaces – will significantly expand their numbers and range. These new populations will be able to flourish, safe from grey squirrels. This iconic species of Scotland’s majestic pinewoods can be saved – Trees for Life has already reintroduced red squirrels to a small number of locations, where they have been successfully breeding and spreading into wider areas. The project will also help expand Scotland’s native woodlands, as red squirrels plant new trees by forgetting where they have buried their winter stores of nuts and seeds. Positive community involvement will inspire people to care for the reintroduced red squirrels through school activities, community events, and citizen science opportunities.

Voting has ended
Plantar uma Arvore

Nominated by:

Engaging Society in Native Forest Restoration, Portugal

Website: http://www.plantarumaarvore.org

The Sintra-Cascais Natural Park, part of the European Union’s Natura 2000 conservation network and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, comprises a precious, varied and unique natural heritage. Its accentuated geological, climatic, hydrological, geomorphological and biological variability results in an especially high diversity of habitats. The variety of habitats of the park is threatened by the dramatic proliferation of invasive exotic species and the consequent loss of biodiversity, habitats and landscapes. The overall project goal is to restore ecologically degraded areas via a volunteer programme involving the local community, visitors and outdoor enthusiasts. The project conservation measures are primarily aimed at promoting the natural regeneration of native forest and native plant species, enhancing biodiversity, controlling invasive exotic species, re-establishing ecological functions and reducing the risk of fire. EOCA funding would be used to directly support the wide range of hands-on conservation work needed to restore native forest habitats. Forty 3 hour events will be organised each year, each with 30-40 participants, totalling 3,780 volunteer hours. They will carry out tasks including removing invasive species, planting native species, reducing fire risk, restoring water courses over an area of 40 hectares. Up to 4,000 native trees and scrubs will be planted each year.

Voting has ended
Indri Lemur image Andrea Massagli

Nominated by:

Reforestation of Indri Lemur Habitat and Development of an Amphibian Trail, Madagascar

Website: https://moneyformadagascar.org

The Mitsinjo Rainforest Reserve is home to a unique range of geographically endemic biodiversity, including the iconic Indri lemur. This large lemur, with its haunting song, is under threat from habitat destruction due to slash & burn agriculture, firewood and timber collection and poaching for meat. Each Indri requires a territory of at least 7ha to sustain its varied herbivorous diet, comprising over 40 species of plant. The Indris’ specific diet makes it hard to breed in captivity and habitat destruction has reduced Indri numbers down to just 9 families in the Mantadia / Torotorofotsy area.  Urgent action is needed to protect and restore the Lemur’s threatened rainforest habitat by joining up isolated pockets of forest.  This project will reforest 20ha of primary forest by planting wildlife corridors of 24,000 trees consisting of over 60 native species. The project will help local Association Mitsinjo to generate funds for further reforestation by increasing the number of visitors to the park. Restoration of 4km of existing rough trails and the creation of 4km of new trails will improve the available guided tours. The new route will take visitors into heart of the forest to a hidden lake, to see the wide range of birds and amphibians. Training in responsible agriculture and alternative income generating activities will reduce the need for families living around the forest to engage in slash and burn agriculture.

Voting has ended
Cabo de Gata Natural Park

Nominated by:

Restoration of native Mediterranean coastal habitats for Climate Change, Spain

Website: http://www.ecoherencia.es

Jujube tree habitat is in serious danger of disappearing and is defined as Habitat of priority Community Interest by European legislation on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora. The habitat fragmentation and the invasive potential of non-native plant species, are two of the key causes of loss in biodiversity and global ecosystemic change. In Spain, those facts affect endangered species of flora of arid areas, that are highly sensitive to climate change. During the 60’s, the agricultural public administration conducted crop trials of invasive exotic species plants originally from Mexico in the coastal and mountainous surroundings of Cabo de Gata Natural Park, which is popular with hikers and bikers. The denaturation of the original landscape and habitat fragmentation, has drastically reduced the number of Jujube trees and associated species, leading to its total or near-total disappearance. This project aims to restore the habitat by strengthening the ecosystem with Zyziphus and Maytenus populations, enhancing associated biodiversity and increasing habitat connectivity.  The project involves local volunteers to plant 3.000 suitable native trees and bushes in two specific areas catalogued by the Natura 2000 network as a Special Conservation Zone (ZEC), covering a total surface area of 40 hectares.

Voting has ended
 
If you are an individual who loves the great outdoors and would like to support our projects, please click the donate button below.
The funding is enabling us to repair a damaged section of the iconic Three Peaks long distance footpath and restore an area of internationally important upland habitat. Voting for our project was a simple but highly effective way for our supporters to show how strongly they felt about improving access and protecting the landscape of this wonderful area. Thank you , EOCA!
Don Gamble, Yorkshire Dales Millenium Trust