Forest


This category contains those projects looking to restore, protect or enhance forest habitats around the world.  For wildlife and for people.
 
Please read though the details of the projects looking for your vote, and then select the one you would like to receive funding from EOCA this year. A difficult choice as they are all very worthwhile projects!

Voting in this category runs from 4 October (00.01 GMT+1) to 18 October (12.00 GMT+1) 2017.

 

Looking For Your Support

Tree Nursery. Image John Fleetwood

Nominated by:

Amboro Analogue Forestry Project, Bolivia

Website: http://www.arbolivia.org.uk

The Vilcabamba-Amboro Conservation Corridor stretches along the Andean foothills From Ecuador, through Peru and Bolivia and includes over a dozen National Parks. Amboro is the last of these at the eastern end and is one of the most botanically and wildlife abundant in the world, with over 4,500 species discovered to date and a high level of endemism.  Underlying poverty in the area leads to the main threats of conversion of forest using slash and burn techniques for agriculture and cattle farming and unsustainable farming methods, as well as illegal hunting, fishing, logging and extraction of Non Timber Forest Products (NTFPs).  Continuing its work in the Amboro National Park which to date has involved over 1000 farming families, The Cochabamba Project seeks to engage a further 20 families to develop integrated land use plans, plant 21,500 trees for timber production, grow cover crops, collect 11,500 native seeds, and improve soil cover and fertility, enabling crop rotation and improving annual yields. It will also establish a new NFTP micro-enterprise as well as hold meetings and training days to support the farmers to decrease their dependency on support staff.  There is an Eco lodge nearby and increasing eco tourism activities provided in the area to enjoy this forest.

Voting has ended
Mum and Baby!

Nominated by:

Conserving the red-bellied guenon, Southern Bénin

Website: http://www.oddbong.org

The Gnanhouizounmè forest is a mosaic of dense forest, gallery forests and swamps and one of the last refuges of the red-bellied monkey and other rare and endangered mammals and birds in Benin. The forest is fragmented into about 20 patches due to human activities. 2 patches have been chosen by the local communities to concentrate protection efforts on and a local forest management committee has been set up using people from each of the 5 districts of the village. The project aims to develop alternative livelihoods for villagers in order to take the pressure of the forest and will train 40 families in snail farming and bee keeping. A community led nursery will provide 25,000 fast growth trees for fuel, construction and to sell, in 10 hectares of land. 25 local people will be trained on how to use clean cook stoves and these in turn will hold community meetings to train further numbers of families. Education to mitigate human-primate conflict will be concentrated on school children to foster affection for primates and towards nature and wildlife and will include a green for locals and tourists. Strengthening of buffer zones will continue through the reforestation of 10 hectares of degraded forest with 16,000 local species, providing fruit for primates.

Voting has ended
photo credit Jacqueline Rohen

Nominated by:

Habitat Restoration and Ecotourism for Chimpanzees, Uganda

Website: http://www.bulindichimpanzees.co.uk

Western Uganda’s Hoima district is dominated by village and agricultural land but small forests occur along watercourses and valleys throughout the 1000 km2 region. These unprotected forests are owned by local village households and provide critical habitat for a population of 300 wild chimpanzees, as well as other primates including black and white colobus, vervets, baboons, and the endangered Ugandan mangabey. Hoima’s small forests have additional conservation value as a wildlife corridor linking two large protected areas to the north and south. The area is threatened by unregulated tourism, pressure for development, and agricultural expansion. The removal of forest leads to crop-raiding by chimpanzees, which are then trapped or killed. For many households the forest is their only source of income. This project will work with local communities to develop local livelihood alternatives from sustainable ecotourism alongside woodlots and ‘chimp friendly’ coffee farming to reduce pressure on natural forest. Tree nurseries will be established and 200,000 coffee trees, 200,000 native species for enrichment planting, and 200,000 fast-growing exotics for woodlots, will be grown. A thorough biodiversity survey will be conducted, guidelines for best practice ecotourism and visitor enhancement will be drawn up, 150 energy-saving stoves will be constructed, and there will be local educational outreach for schoolchildren and adults.

Voting has ended
Image Matt Hunt

Nominated by:

Jahoo Gibbon Camp, Cambodia

Website: http://cambodia.wcs.org

More than 90% of the core zone of Keo Seima Wildlife Sanctuary (KSWS) remains covered by natural vegetation and contains an unusually high diversity of forest types. It is home to many different species, including the endangered black-shanked douc langur and yellow cheeked crested gibbon. The main threats to the area continue to be illegal land clearance, poaching, and illegal logging. Jahoo Gibbon Camp was established in 2014 to provide a sustainable income for local people and to encourage understanding of the need for intact forests and ecosystems around the village. This community-led ecotourism project is centered round a forest camp from which visitors conduct primate and bird watching walks in the beautiful surrounding forest. In addition to staff salaries and a base Community Development Fund contribution, each time any of the two key primate species or three key bird species are seen by a tourist, an additional bonus from the tourist fee is paid to the community, incentivising the community to protect the forest and wildlife in it. EOCA funding will be used to safeguard the forest and wildlife around the village and camp by supporting wildlife ranger patrols, important to combat forest crime. It will be used to improve the on-going gibbon habituation programme, and to build staff capacity through training and a study trip, as well as supporting small improvements to the camp. This project strengthens local institutions, important for the rights of the Bunong indigenous people, and to avoid an unregulated land claims, especially by profit-driven outsiders coming to the village.

Voting has ended
Smithills.  Image WT Media Library

Nominated by:

Smithills - creating a resilient landscape, UK

Website: https://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk

Standing proud, to the north of Bolton, and visible on the skyline of Manchester, the 690 hectare (1706 acre) Smithills Estate lies on the southern edge of the West Pennine Moors. It is an upland site with open, windswept moors dissected by sheltered, wooded river valleys and a patchwork of farmland. The vision for Smithills Estate is a wildlife-rich, resilient landscape, able to adapt to and cope with current and future threats and challenges such as climate change, pollution, pests and diseases, and to provide people in the area with a wide range of services and benefits. With EOCA funding, The Woodland Trust will undertake a programme of tree planting activity to plant 33,000 trees, buffering existing woodland and providing new homes for wildlife along gills and cloughs leading up to the moorland, as well as in hedgerows and field corners. In addition, a wide-ranging programme of recreational activities, learning and volunteering opportunities and new and improved visitor facilities will enable local people to engage with Smithills and experience the outdoors.

Voting has ended
 
If you are an individual who loves the great outdoors and would like to support our projects, please click the donate button below. During 2017, all money donated will fund tree planting in Nepal as part of our 2 Million Tree Project.
The funding is enabling us to repair a damaged section of the iconic Three Peaks long distance footpath and restore an area of internationally important upland habitat. Voting for our project was a simple but highly effective way for our supporters to show how strongly they felt about improving access and protecting the landscape of this wonderful area. Thank you , EOCA!
Don Gamble, Yorkshire Dales Millenium Trust